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REPORT: New health issues tied to low-level lead exposure for children, teens AND adults; No really safe level of lead exposure

A recent government study, prepared with help of researchers from Johns Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health, tallies the wide-ranging damage low-level lead exposure can do, beyond the well-documented effects of reducing youngsters’ IQ and undermining their ability to learn and control their behavior. Hearing and even the onset of puberty may be affected in children, while in adults, kidneys and blood pressure may be harmed.

“There does not appear to be a really safe level of lead exposure,” said Andrew A. Rooney, a senior health scientist with the National Toxicology Program who coordinated the review of existing research. “The best course of action,” he added, “is to eliminate all lead exposure from our environment.”

The quotes above are from a story written by Baltimore Sun Reporter Timothy B. Wheeler regarding a recent government study, prepared with help of researchers from Johns Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health, that tallies the wide-ranging damage low-level lead exposure can do on people of all ages, which go beyond the well-documented effects of children and young people.

READ THE FULL STORY HERE

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